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Intersection of Conflict Resolution & International Development Studies


©Alison Ralph. MSC Students. Menno Simons College.

At MSC, we’ve identified two streams of study that highlight the complementary nature of Conflict Resolution Studies and International Development Studies. Students who are studying in either field will have their knowledge and practice strengthened and broadened by taking courses in the other.

In particular, we’ve identified these two streams:

 

Restorative Justice–Community Development

This stream will equip students with the analytical and practical skills to build the capacities of individuals and groups for holistic, healthy relationships, and just communities.

Community empowerment and welfare is at the heart of both restorative justice and community development work. Restorative justice can be described as an alternative vision of justice through healing rather than punishment. In restorative justice, an offender is held accountable to those most directly affected—the community—and must work to restore their wellbeing.

Similarly, community development is concerned with the welfare and empowerment of communities and their members. Community-based development sees the community as the most important aspect of socio-economic activity.

Students interested in working with communities to influence positive change will benefit from taking courses in the stream of Restorative Justice–Community Development.

RESTORATIVE JUSTICE–COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
CRS 2221 RESTORATIVE JUSTICE
CRS 2241 CONFLICT & CULTURE
CRS 2251/61 CONFLICT IN THE FAMILY I & II
CRS 2252 CONFLICT & COMMUNICATION
CRS 2262 CONFLICT, FAITH & COMMUNITY
CRS 2271 CONFLICT WITHIN GROUPS
CRS 3240 WORKPLACE CONFLICT RESOLUTION
CRS 4224 INNER PEACE AND CONFLICT TRANS.
IDS 2110 PART. LOCAL DEVELOPMENT
IDS 2171 CRISIS, HUMANITARIAN AID & DEV.
IDS 2243 CONF. & DEV. IN INDIGENOUS COM.
IDS 2521 STUDY OF VOLUNTARY SIMPLICITY
 

International Development–Peacebuilding

Students taking courses in this stream will be equipped with theory and practice to build strategic capacities for peace and wellness across international and community contexts.

Development and peacebuilding concepts complement each other at both the international and community level. Stable communities that experience low levels of violence are able to devote their efforts and abilities to address inequalities or injustices, thus potentially preventing future conflicts. According to peace practitioner Lisa Schirch, peacebuilding “aims to create societies that affirm human dignity through meeting human needs and human rights.”*

Relational in nature, peacebuilding encourages the development of relationships across all levels of society. Communities can advocate for structural and systemic changes that may enhance development or peace efforts in a region. International and national actors can work with people and communities “on the ground” to assist with development and peacebuilding efforts.

Students interested in learning about systems, structures, and actors that contribute to the peace and wellbeing of communities around the world will benefit from courses in the International Development–Peacebuilding stream.

INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT–PEACEBUILDING
CRS 2231 NONVIOLENT SOCIAL CHANGE
CRS 2421 LEGAL SYSTEMS & ALT. DISPUTE RES.
CRS 2431 NEGOTIATION THEORY & PRACTICE
CRS 3220 MODELS FOR CONFLICT TRANS.
CRS 2131 HISTORY OF PEACE & NONVIOLENCE
CRS 3242 WOMEN & PEACEBUILDING
CRS 3331 GENOCIDE, WAR & VIOLENT CONFLICT
IDS 2130 HISTORY OF THE DEVELOPING WORLD
IDS 2131 RURAL DEVELOPMENT (REVISED)
IDS 2183 AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT ISSUES
IDS 2603 ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY
IDS 3111 DEVELOPMENT AID POLICIES
IDS 3160 CULT. PERSP. ON GLOBAL PROCESSES
IDS 3901 HUMANITARIAN AID & CONFLICT
 

*Schirch, Lisa, The Little Book of Peacebuilding (Intercourse, Pennsylvania: 2004), 13.